Cooper’s London

Theatre, Travel

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YOUNG VIC: UP AND COMING YOUR WAY

The Young Vic is, I would bet, about to hit a roll. For those of you in New York, the wonderful production of A Doll’s House directed by Carrie cracknellCracknell that they produced last year https://apollosgirl.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/fearless-rediscovery/

and which is now having a very successful season as a transfer in the West End, will be heading for New York to BAM with the West End cast. http://www.digitaltheatre.com/production/details/a-dolls-house That’s hattie morahanthe one where the set is actually a blown-up doll’s house, and Hattie Morahan’s portrayal of Nora Helmer has already won her the Critic’s Circle Best Actress award, among others.  I don’t know that she will win a Tony; but I would sure bet heavily that she’ll be nominated.  Be alert and buy the tickets while there are still some left.

Highlights of the upcoming season in London at the Young Vic will now include:

  • A production of the Kander and Ebb musical The Scotsboro Boys directed by Susan Stroman from 18 October 2013
  • A pre-Christmas production of Beauty and the Beast that sounds funky and fascinating and will be in the tiny Maria Theatre, an experimental space
  • Gillian Anderson undertaking the role of Blanche DuBois in a new production of A Streetcar Named Desire to be directed by Benedict Andrews
  • Juliet Stevenson as Winnie in Samuel Beckett’s intense and surreal masterpiece Happy Days
  • peter brookPeter Brook bringing a newly conceived show (The Valley of Astonishment) that, says the preview note, “mixes neurological research and Persian verse”. Well, it is Peter Brook …

If you’re looking for a Christmas present for someone who lives in London and loves the theatre, you might want to get them a season ticket or a subscription.  For the foreseeable future the Young Vic is one of the most consistently exciting, reliable and stimulating places to get your bit of a theatre-night-out.  And the restaurant still does the best hamburgers in London.

To give a gift, or to “friend” the theatre, (includes the perk of priority booking for any or all the above): http://www.youngvic.org/support-us/friends

On the Road, Part Two: O, Canada!

Who says you can’t go home again? I’ve just spent over a month in my home and native land and I have to tell you that after a couple of weeks exploring banffthe Rockies in Alberta, Jasper, Banff, Edmonton, and Calgary and its stampede, my wife was asking why hadn’t we brought up our kids there instead of England? All that space; all that clean air; so few crowds. Then, after three days in Toronto with my family, she said: Now I know why we stayed in the UK. It takes an ocean between us to dilute some of the intensity!

Still, we enjoyed the whole experience, including my somewhat time-consuming but very loving family. Canadians are, by and large, rather keen on local culture – from totem poles and local food festivals to work for local actors, directors and scenic designers. There were lots of arts events to choose from: fringe plays in Edmonton that were stimulating and in really interesting small spaces; brilliantly performed Fiddler on the Roof and  Shakespeare in Stratford, Ontario; a terrific production of Tom Stoppard’s Utopia in Niagara-on-the-Lake that sold out in about three seconds flat. I’d have recommended them all, but alas, they are all gone with the summer festival season . But the most surprisingly Anything Goes Tourenjoyable show I saw was Anything Goes in Toronto, with the irrepressible and totally compelling Rachel York as Reno Sweeney, worth the pricey tickets even though it was the same production I had seen in London a few years ago. 

So next year, if you’re going to Canada to enjoy the scenic splendour, do also google the festivals in places like Stratford, and Niagara-on-the-Lake and book early, because both are popular and reliably first-rate. I think that I’d actually want to live in Niagara-on-the-Lake, it’s so lovely; or somewhere in Eastern Ontario like Port Hope.

All this, however,  was overshadowed by encounters with bears, chipmunks and elk in the Rockies and family visits and reunions in Toronto. The farmers marketcity was lively and the weather was lovely; the cafés were full and the farmer’s markets dazzling. And I found some wonderful book stores too! I simply basked! In Toronto you want to visit Bloor Street near Brunswick Avenue/Bathurst Street and look, on the south side, for BMV and Book City. Just make sure you have a large, really strong cloth bag with you and lots of time for exploring. You will then be able to enjoy your finds over some of the best coffee in town.  One of the weddings I went over for was a Fiddler on the Roof meets Las Vegas floor show—great entertainment, and too much food as well. My sore legs the next day told me in no uncertain terms that my dancing days were over.

I came away feeling there’s a lot to do in Canada; I’m more eager than ever to get back to revisit the places I’ve been and also, once more, Quebec City, Montreal, ottawaOttawa (the most underrated city beautiful in North America, ed.) and, finally, Vancouver. Next time I may even take the cross-country train. It takes about five days and offers spectacular vistas 24/7. http://canadarail.ca/

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