Archive for December, 2014

Cooper’s London

December 14, 2014

Art

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Anselm Kiefer: The Sword
in the Stone

For those who love art, who love politics, history, and genius, the Anselm Kiefer retrospective at the Royal Academy was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It ran for less than three months, drawing huge crowds and a great deal of attention. If only it could have been a permanent installation! I was able to go only at the end, knowing as soon as I submarinesentered the RA’s normally staid 17th-century courtyardto be confronted by a fleet of dented German submarines that had been rusting since World War Two—that this was going to be a life-changing experience. It was also clear that none of the images of Kiefer’s work that I’d seen could begin to prepare me for what filled almost the entire building…the work itself.

I had heard of his iconoclasm; of the kiefer 2confrontation with the Nazi and collaborationist guilt of WWII (beginning in the 1960s when no one in Germany would talk about it); and about his idiosyncratic ways of structuring his startling photos (building on them with layers and layers of paint and other materials) and installations (found objects, broken metal, wood, cement). No matter what I’d heard or seen reproduced small, I had not expected the constructions to speak to me with such immediacy, energy and utter power.

But above all, no one had prepared me for the amazing textures that surrounded me; the astounding technical audacity, the corrosive wit of what he had  painted and sculpted and hewn; or the sheer size of what he had made (with Kiefer, size matters). Or how masterfully The Royal Academy displayed all of it. Kiefer is as provocative, shocking and moving as reported. His works have multi-layered impact, and are appalling and moving simultaneously. He is quintessentially modern, and yet somehow classic, a Michaelangelo of shattered concrete, of vertiginous suggestions of ruin, and historic guilt imagery.These works embody what W. B, Yeats meant when he talked about “monuments to unaging intellect.”

kiefer 3

 

One of the images that haunts me the orders of the nightthe most is The Orders of the Night (1996), a huge canvas with a tactility that is astonishing and bold. Like many of his works, it’s an image that works on its own but also can evoke all the terrors and insanities of the 20th century, especially of World War II and what has followed since. It stands for all destructive and horrifying impulses that mankind is still overwhelmed by; and yet it also, somehow, excites and redeems because of the direct, staring confrontation with it all.

Anselm Kiefer retrospective - LondonKiefer’s latest works – referential of Van Gogh and his cornfields – are images just as mad and marvellous as the early works that made him famous. Ash Flower, roughly 12 feet tall by 21 feet wide, has ash scattered over its entire surface; it creates a kind of veil over the image of a building, a neoclassical construction reminiscent of the insane and grandiose architecture that Hitler loved to build for his new empire. At the bottom of the painting there is a layer of cracked earth that is actually crumbling; and from top to bottom, a single, huge, dried sunflower. Like the best metaphors, like the greatest art, it is impossible to define what it means exactly, though that meaning is terribly clear at the gut level. You have to stand in front of it, you have to see it, you have to experience it to “get” it. What was almost as overwhelming as the exhibition itself was seeing how excited, enthusiastic, and deeply affected everyone was—and what a great mix of ages they represented. Perhaps some may hate some of the works (or be frightened by what they express), or be put off by some of the philosophy that is difficult to acknowledge. But you don’t need to “understand” everything. This is viscerally engaging imagery that speaks a language of its own, best absorbed by simply experiencing it.

If far from conventionally attractive, these works are of seminal importance to art today and you need to be aware of them, to think about them. Without question, they can only be experienced properly in person. The photos and films are souvenirs, memory joggers; but are no substitute for a one-on-one confrontation.

la ribauteThe RA has done a real service with this monumental retrospective in which the development of a life’s unusual work (so far) can be grasped, reflected upon and experienced in a suitable setting. It also inspired me to visit Kiefer’s extraordinary factory/studio in Barjac, France.

kiefer 5

But above all it showed me that so much energy, raw intellect and emotion, even when producing fragmented images in unexpected materials, creates its own kind of intense and emotionally charged beauty.

The British critic, Jonathan Jones, reviewing this exhibition wrote in London’s Guardian newspaper:

“This exhibition is an exhilarating roller coaster ride of beauty and horror, deeply exciting and enriching – yet, at its heart is a knowledge of history that puts all those pleasures in question. At some level, Kiefer, who began by equating … the German romantic art of Caspar David Friedrich that he loves kiefer saluteand the evil of Nazism – wonders if he even has the right to make art.”

The most frustrating aspect of this extraordinary experience is that the show is not travelling. So you will have to buy the catalogue, or make do with the occasional Kiefer gallery show.

Philosopher, historian, iconoclast, observer of human frailty and human heroism: whatever you have heard or thought about the artist in the past, this show confirms that he is indubitably a giant of contemporary culture and art. And yes, seeing what he has made will change your life.

 


Apollo’s Girl

December 10, 2014

Music

apollo and lyre

 

Come to the Cabaret…

Sing for Your Supper at HENRY’s
with NYFOS After Hours

The first time I went to HENRY’s was to join friends for dinner and stay on for the evening’s celebrationSing for Your Supper (A Crystal Anniversary Cabaret). What a night it was! The show opened with (what else?) “Sing for Your Supper,” skipped to an original take on “I’m Not Getting Married Today” (by the same tenor who had been an ardent, brilliant Lenski in Juilliard’s Eugene Onegin), and included a heartbreaking “Maria” from West Side Story, from another tenor (now at the Met, but also once a cameraman for Doctor Phil). Song after song, the evening made the spirits soar. When the cheers were over, we floated home, remaining aloft for several days.

henry's exteriorHENRY’s, you see, is all about heat and light. Bright red window frames entice you across Broadway toward the glow of outside sconces beneath awnings. Crossing the street, you’ll spot branches of tiny lights on a picket fence; more clues to what lies within. When you enter, arts and crafts chandeliers diffuse warmth from 15-foot ceilings; the room is generous, with big tables close enough for buzz but far enough for conversation. A forgotten art? Not in this neighborhood—packed with locals from uptown’s university row and media worker bees. They will come to eat, drink, meet one another and, on this particular night (December 15), be very, very merry.

Why is this night different from all other nights?steve at piano
It’s the restaurant’s fifth annual
A Goyische Christmas to You, part of NYFOS After Hours, the brainchild and one offspring of a partnership between Henry Rinehart and Steve Blier. And how did that come to be?
Because, in the Upper West Side’s mantra, real estate is destiny.                            

About 15 years ago, Blier, a fabled, hyper-busy musician, writer, coach, accompanist, entrepreneur, polymath and all-around wit with no time to cook at the end of the day, was desperate for dinner. And there, across the street from his apartment, HENRY’s beckoned. Blier simply followed his nose. For
henry reinhartHENRY’s had good attitude, good food, and plenty of it. And it had Henry himself: restaurateur, actor, art connoisseur and showman. The rest is history.

HENRY’s became Blier’s de facto dining room, and Henry got a piano for Steve to play. Over time, the two cooked up a plan: a free-form cabaret series, called Sing for Your Supper, where the up-and-coming singers Steve knew could entertain after hours in a unique neighborhood boite, be embraced in a knowing group hug, and be fed well in the bargain. It was all about the atmospherebeing able to relax on the one hand, and being appreciated on the other. The crowd makes it work: there are communal tables to encourage friendly interactions 101206_Henrys_314 copythat will prosper, and fans of Blier’s many other activities, most of them closely related to NYFOS (New York Festival of Song), the umbrella organization he and Michael Barrett founded in 1988. Since then, NYFOS has grown from a modest musical trial balloon with legs into a helium-powered gondola headed right into space.

NYFOS’ agenda is as inclusive as the enthusiasts who pack its concerts in New York, Boston, Caramoor, the North Fork and a long roster of A-list venues. They relish Blier’s philosophy of everything “… from Debussy to doo-wop, lieder to latin jazz, Josquin to just-written.” The shows are unified by a theme and constructed with a dramatic arc; superb vocal artists bring the songs to vivid life, with the directors as accompanists and animated narrators. NYFOS cabaret at Henry'sBut what makes them go, in the end, is Blier’s wicked humor and encyclopedic grasp of music, his love of sharing them, and the infinity of tunes in his head and fingers. They make his special brand of magic and guarantee that no matter how much you knew about the evening’s choices when you arrive, you will know more by the time you (reluctantly) drag yourself away from the party. And you will feel like part of it from the first note to the last.

Now back to NYFOS After Hours: For those of you with 101206_Henrys_234a good calender app, it may inform you that A Goysiche Christmas to You takes place on December 15, the night before Chanukah. And why not? It is, after all, the Feast of Light, and the occasion generates a lot of it for an ecumenical bunch. You will be happy with what you see and hear. But reservations are essential! http://www.henrysnyc.com/
And there more to look forward to: a season’s worth of concerts, some new NYFOS After Hours cabarets at HENRY’s, and CDs to keep you on the wavelength in the meantime. http://www.nyfos.org/events.html

What will you take away from the experience? Just have a look at the evening news on any channel…then go through Henry’s red door and join the group for the kind of community that most of us only dream about but can actually find inside, around the piano, watching Steve Blier after hourscast his spell. Hang out for a while after the show, talk to your fellow-celebrants and meet the artists. Then, holding tight to your metaphorical balloons, float out into the night. If you’re lucky, it will get you through the news for the rest of the week. Or maybe just give the news a rest and enjoy the memories. You can always come back for lunch, brunch, dinner and drinks at HENRY’s while you’re waiting for the next show.


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