Apollo’s Girl

FILM

apollo and lyre

 

 

Summer in the City:

What to See…

As always, there’s good stuff at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and there’s always a retrospective to remind you of what you may have missed and get you images (3)through the dog days. This year it’s Richard Lesterthe irrefutable answer to the pressing question, “Whatever became of fun?”

Lester’s career followed its own arc: an icon of 60s Britain, he was an American (like many other film expats) who chose London over Hollywood. There were some compelling reasons. While we were ramping up in Vietnam, London was exploding with a revolution in film, theatre, music, fashion and art fueled by idiosyncratic, fearless prodigies who reveled in the city’s openness to change and low cost of living. Being there was a singular treat; next best is seeing what made it so special.

images (2)If Harold Pinter: Comedies of Menace and Quiet Desperation (FSLC 2013) was a bellweather of the era’s dark side; Lester’s upcoming retrospective (August 7 – 13) is the one to make you laugh most of the time and, in the case of the Beatles’ Hard Day’s Night, to be snatched up into the heart of a whirlwind that retains its magic to this day. Seeing it for the first time? Lucky you – prepare to dance in the streets after it’s over! To find out more about Lester, read Sam Kashner’s Vanity Fair interview (Making Beatlemania: A Hard Day’s Night at 50): article and secure your tickets to the retrospective seats

images (5)Before Lester takes the screens, as part of Sound+Vision (July 29 – August 7) you can dip into some homegrown post-Beatles’ beats with Brendan Toller’s Danny Says on opening night, and meet both filmmaker and subject afterwards, and ponder Julian Temple’s images (4)The Ecstasy of Wilko Johnson. Johnson may be rock’s only star who can read passages from Canterbury Tales in flawless Middle English and lead you gently into contemplating your own mortality. And there’s much more: http://www.filmlinc.com/films/series/sound-vision-2015

Catch up with Sean Baker’s Tangerine and Crystal Moselle’s The Wolfpack , held over and going strong tangerine_6at the Elinor Bunin Munro Film Center. Tangerine is a no-holds-barred dip into the seamy, steamy transgender street life of LA hustlers shot (beautifully) on an iPhone 55, and anchored by the epic turn of newcomer Kitana Kiki Rodriguez. Wolfpack, on the other hand, is Tangerine’s polar opposite. Following the coming-of-age of seven siblings who have been kept indoors on the Lower East Side, schooled at home, and enlightened by a diet of films which they have come to memorize and act out in home-grown performances, wolfpack-1024it’s original and startling all the way through. By the end, as the older brothers finally break away to enter the outside world, you are haunted by what their futures will be like and deeply curious about the possibilities of a sequel.

Finally, Nadav Lapid’s The Kindergarten Teacher (NDNF 2015) is coming back This original and download (2)unsettling look at genius and ambition richly deserves another run. Opening July 31; don’t miss it this time around! (https://apollosgirl.wordpress.com/2015/04/22/apollos-girl-57/)

images (7)And, as an end-of-summer special treat, FSLC will screen West Side Story on August 28 at 7:45pm, outdoors on the plaza, where it was actually filmed in 1960 (when there were vacant tenements, a cement basketball court and some very mean streets about to be turned into what is now Lincoln Center). 

Phoenix (Lincoln Plaza and IFC center)

Eager to see the newest work of the director and stars of Barbara (Christian Petzold, Nina Hoss and Ronald Zehrfeld) I enjoyed a recent screening of Phoenix download (4)and set out to write a review. The story of hidden identity, Holocaust survival, betrayal, infidelity and constancy unfolded like a great, twisty period (post-World War II) mystery, acted by a superb cast, directed by a superb director and photographed by Hans Fromm, another Barbara alumnus. It seemed, with a Metascore of 91, like a straightforward rave. And who doesn’t like a great, twisty period mystery?

But it wasn’t about just loving the excellent work of cast and crew; there was also something subtle that wasn’t easily identifiedsomething about the story that made me want to know more about it, and about its origins. A slight sense of displacementperhaps something about its characters and its locationso I pursued the mystery further. Here’s what I found:

Hubert Monteilhet. (Photo by Jacques Lange/Paris Match via Getty Images)

Hubert Monteilhet. (Photo by Jacques Lange/Paris Match via Getty Images)

In 1963, Hubert Monteilhet (prolific French author and winner of the Grand Prix de litérature policière), who specialized in mysteries and historical novels, wrote a best-seller, Le Retour des cendres. The film rights were quickly snapped up in the UK, and a script written (by Monteilhet and Julius Epstein of Casablanca fame); the director was J. Lee Thompson (Planet of the Apes franchise), and the cast starred Ingrid Thulin and Maximillian Schell, with Samantha Eggar playing a character later excised from Phoenix. While the actors spoke English, the story (like the novel) was set in France. The dubious character of the anti-hero was much the same (although he was a chess master rather than a bar porter, and the heroine an X-ray technician, rather than a cabaret singer). The plot was even more complicated then that of Phoenix, but was still deeply concerned with identity and morality. Jazz great John Dankworth did the score for Le Retour (I’m curious about that, too), where Phoenix embedded Kurt Weill’s “Speak Low” as a leitmotif throughout the film.

Petzhold’s choices in developing Phoenix were those of a brilliant images (8)filmmaker, but its journey from post-war France to post-war Germany (they were, surely, very different landscapes) wasn’t entirely seamless. Nevertheless, Phoenix’ 91 Metascore tells you how well he stitched the pieces of his pattern together, and why the process of adaptation—without which there would be no film industryis a challenge best undertaken by those, like Petzhold, with the skill and imagination to transform their source material and the actors to follow their lead.

The Outrageous Sophie Tucker (Cinema Village)

At the end of The Outrageous Sophie Tucker, after all the song 494825881_640credits, where you would expect the lengthy thank-yous that usually end a non-fiction labor of love, the producers (Susan and William Ecker) and director (William download (6)Gazecki) have fashioned a list from the heart: every category includes “Best” before the title noun and name: Best Microfilming Company Ever; New Best Friends; Best Friend Lawyer; New Best Friend Accountant and, notably, New Best Friend and Future Screenwriting Partner: Aaron Sorkin.

 

All of this is entirely appropriate for a film that is, at its beating heart, an unabashed love letter to a Red Hot Mama like no otherSonia Kalish Abuza Tucker, aka images (12)Sophie—whose immigrant rags-to riches story (she was born during her voyage from the Ukraine to America) led her from singing in her parents’ restaurant to performing at the London Palladium for the King and Queen of England. Her appetites were large; she was married three times, had a son who lived in his mother’s shadow all his life, and enjoyed “intimate friendships” with many women (including Lady Edwina Mountbatten). And that’s only for starters.

In the days before television she became a household word by touring, keeping lists of everyone she met on the way, and staying in touch to build an enormous, effective fan base, writing—by hand—cards and letters to each of them to remind them she’d be returning to their area and hoped to see them in the seats. In the 20s and 30s, she sold nostalgia for an earlier time of vaudeville and burlesque, performing songs her theatrical way with a powerful voice, ample body, and confident patter that crossed every social boundary and geographic border. Her radio shows, films, Broadway musicals, and club dates kept her before an adoring public for more than half a century. Wait til you see the footage, and the celebrity interviews….

download (5)So yes, the film is a cinematic love letter, made by writers on whose biography it is based (Susan and William Ecker), and essentially a family affair by them and director William Gazecki. It certainly gives you a sense of Tucker’s talent and magnetism and reminds you how appealing she was. For those who can remember her performances, Outrageous is a welcome feast of nostalgia. For those too young to have known her, it’s a primer for feeling the love. But, at the end, when sentimental tears are flowing, it leaves you curious to know more, to explore this over-the-top public talent more deeply. As much as Soph (as her friends called her) seemed to let it all hang out, her personal life was way ahead of its time, yet enigmatic and fully understood only by her. http://www.sophietucker.com/

P.S.: Special kudos for Guy Digenti’s Best Scrapbook Design, Motion Graphics, and Digital Puppetry.

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