Posts Tagged ‘london theatre’

Cooper’s London

March 13, 2016

Theatre/Opera

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Coming Up:
New and Different
(and Same Old) Stuff
in London

Despite regular and justified complaints that the London Theatre is being diminished by economic cuts and producers so terrified of losing money they’ll attempt nothing innovative or unusual, there’s still a surprisingly healthy scene for theatre-lovers. Not just in the capital but also thrughout the UK, where repertory theatres and major touring prouctions are alive and well and doing very good business. The continuing glory of the scene is the variety of approaches from the classics to the funky revivals of more recent plays and musicals; these are almost always original or subversive and also showcase extraordinary and treasurable talents.

Hoff0611Like every other marketplace, though, caveat emptor rules. For instance: I thought a new musical called Last Night a DJ Saved My Life was unadulterated dross, but it’s been touring extensively and has an audience that clearly adores its star, David Hasselhoff, who is the main draw. (He was a US TV magnet in The Young and the Restless, a popular soap, and a leading man in Baywatch.) Is he the Donald Trump of American entertainers, some stranger said during the interval? No. He’s much too classy by comparison. However, to me his show is a perfect example of creativity based entirely on opportunism and the lowest common denominator audiences. And lucky you! you’ll be able to see for yourself what the fuss is about on US TV very soon! It was filmed live on stage here in Oxford just for your delectation. And I bet you’ll be able to buy the DVD damned cheaply about two months after its release.

On the other hand, Chicago, for instance, has a touring company on its third round of all the UK’s notable venues, with such an interesting and slickly adept new cast that it’s selling out again with dangerous liaisonsgood reason. In London, there’s Dangerous Liaisons at the Donmar Warehouse, revived after 30 years with Christopher Hampton’s script/adaptation and a cast that includes the excellent Dominic West (as a less sinister but sexier Valmont than usual), and a scary Janet McTear as a believably evil Madame Merteuil, as well as veterans such as Una Stubbs. The pleasure of the revival, of “collecting” the performances, is undeniable; but it isn’t exactly an innovative idea. The play was recently broadcast live in cinemas and hopefully will be released on DVD preserve this production.

An interesting new production of Jean Anouilh’s Le voyageur sans bagages has just followed Dangerous Liaisons into the Donmar; I recommend this because Anouilh is, these days, unfairly neglected and underrated in the English-speaking world. This production is a new English version of the play by Anthony Weigh with a worthy but not starry cast. Weigh has called his new version Welcome Home, Captain Fox! and I’m guessing that it’ll be as much a reminder of Anouilh’s importance as the production of Flare Path was a year ago for reviving interest in Terrance Rattigan. (Written at the height of the Blitz in World War II and a favourite play of Winston Churchill’s, Flare Path has been successfully touring the country since its return to the West End.)

Another classic revival in the West End is a new fiennesadaptation, this time by David Hare, of Ibsen’s The Master Builder. With Ralph Fiennes for his Big Name Star, Matthew Warchus direct’s a very strong interpretation of the play and has a cast that works brilliantly as an ensemble. After 19 March The Master Builder is followed at the Old Vic by a new production of Harold Pinter’s The Caretaker with the brilliant Timothy Spall and again directed by the very imaginative (and very busy) Matthew Warchus, whose gift for inhabiting the text never fails to illuminate unexpected insights.

Down the road at the Young Vic, you might want to check out the plays in the smaller auditoria for new, funky texts. On the Main Stage, Peter Brook’s Battlefield, an adaptation of the Mahabaratha, played to full houses until 27 February, trailing clouds of glory from the Theatre des Bouffes du Nord in Paris. Brook has a virtual annual residency for his work at the Young Vic, and a very fortunate thing that is for London, too. Following at the Young Vic is a show/musical/cabaret called If You Kiss Me, Kiss Me that sounds both interesting andhorrocks unusual. Starring the multi-talented Jane Horrocks (another Young Vic regular, having done The Good Woman of Szechuan and Annie Get Your Gun there), and conceived by her with Aletta Collins, who directs and choreographs, this promises to be memorable theatre. It runs in the main house from 10 March to 15 April. I am also looking forward to A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing in the Young Vic’s The Maria auditorium. Annie Ryan has adapted the novel by Elmear McBride and the star turn by Aiofe Duffin promises to be unforgettable.

At the National Theatre, the play that interests me the most this season is their production of Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom by August Wilson. Sharon D. Clarke is Ma Rainey and the director is Dominic Cooke, who ran the Royal Court Theatre so successfully from 2007-2013. From the stylish and apt way this production works, He clearly has a real affinity for this material. It’s ma raineyrunning in repertoire until mid-May according to current listings, but if it’s a success it will hopefully simply carry on. It’s one of the most powerful and exciting of the sequence of plays by Wilson portraying the experience of African-Americans, decade by decade, in the 20th century. Also coming up at the National from the end of March is a production of Lorraine Hansberry’s neglected and virtually unknown masterpiece, Les Blancs. The director is Yael Farber whose work has dazzled me since I saw a production of hers brought to the UK from South Africa about ten years ago. I need know nothing more. If you see the name Yael Farber as director on anything anywhere ever, just buy tickets and go. There’s also a revival of the notorious Harley Grandville-threepennyBarker play Waste that was famously banned by the UK censor in 1910 or so. You can still just catch that one. But just as excitingly as Ma Rainey, the RNT is staging a new production of the Brecht-Weill iconic Threepenny Opera from 18 May. Rufus Norris is directing a cast that includes Rory Kinnear.

Joshua Harmon’s successful comedy, Bad Jews, returned to London for a month from mid-February for a run at the Theatre Royal Haymarket. Ilan Goodman reprised his much-applauded role as Liam, alongside new cast members Ailsa Joy, Antonia Kinlay, and Jos Slovick. This American play is directed by Michael Longhurst. And Matthew Perry, of erstwhile Friends fame, has just opened in a play he himself has written called The End of Longing, about which I have heard not such very good things. Still, it is a brand-new play! There don’t seem to be many of those around these days!

Meanwhile the Almeida is doing yet another Uncle Vanya in a new version by Robert Icke. It runs through the end of March. It’s always worth seeing Uncle Vanya and the Almeida has a very good record with classics like this, so if you are in the mood for some Chekov, this could be a good bet. And when Nina announces that she’s a seagull for the third time, I think everyone in the audience should shout out: So flock off, lady! and see what happens…

Uncle Vanya is followed at the Almeida by a new play by Leo Butler called Boy. Last year, director-designer team Sacha Wares and Miriam Buether had a success with a groundbreaking production of a play called Game at the Almeida; however, the excitement and hype around this new production of theirs is based not just on their work as a team but also on the writing of Leo Butler who seems to be establishing himself as a talented playwright of political polemics that address hard current issues.

A new play about that Cockney cutie Nell Gwynn by Jessica Swale has moved at last from Shakespeare’s Globe to the Apollo Theatre in the Strand. Nell_Gwynne_and_King_CharlesYou may recall that Nell (the mistress of Charles II) was one of the first actresses in England ever, and probably an inspiration for the character of Amber St Claire in the ripe Restoration bodice-ripper Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor. I’m attracted to this one partly because I just saw the excellent Queen Anne at the RSC and read again the brilliant and unjustly neglected masterpiece of a novel, Henry Esmond, by William Thackeray. This new play is like a prequel to all that.

This time round the consistently brilliant and many-faceted Gemma Arterton is

Gemma Arterton as Nell Gwynn ©Alastair Muir 10.02.16 Nell Gwynn 166

Gemma Arterton as Nell Gwynn ©Alastair Muir 10.02.16 Nell Gwynn 166

playing Nell. There was controversy over the casting of Gugu Mbatha-Raw in the role because she is black, but she’s a rising star and may be too busy with conflicting commitments. Do Google her! She’s quite wonderful. Also, Christopher Luscombe is directing Nell Gwynn again with some other cast changes as well. Luscombe is one of the most consistent, intelligent and witty directors in the UK at the moment. I always try to see anything he puts his hand to. His production of Shakespeare’s Merry Wives of Windsor from the Globe Theatre, for instance, is available on DVD and is a good way to get a measure of just how talented this man is. Even though Arterton and Luscombe are involved, I’ll miss Gugu Mbatha-Raw, who caught the essence of a woman able to captivate both king and country. But then I expect Arterton to do no less. It’s a bawdy, entertaining and informative evening’s theatre. You might also want to check out the overlapping story of Edward Kynaston in Richard Eyre’s delightful 2004 film Stage Beauty (starring Claire Danes).

Also of note: the Royal Court is bringing the play I See You by Mongiwekhaya to London, before it plays at the Market Theatre in Johannesburg, part of its commitment to international new plays which has long defined its lineup; while Jamie Lloyd is directing a new production of Genet’s The Maids at Trafalgar Studio 1; and the Kenneth Branagh Company season continues with The painkillerPainkiller at the Garrick Theatre from early March. The Painkiller stars Branagh and Rob Brydon in the Walter Matthau and Jack Lemon roles from Billy Wilder’s film adaptation of this material called Buddy, Buddy. Wilder’s film was based, in turn, on a play by Francis Veber; the material is adapted here by Sean Foley who also directs. Another attraction of this production is the appearance in one of the roles of the inestimable Claudie Blakely.

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…and some notes on notes…

The ENO has just done a successful-enough production of Norma directed by Christopher Alden. It has a strong cast and conductor and is set in the 19th century for reasons that make no sense to me, and it’s interesting to see how Alden approaches one of the ultimate, romantic, bel canto works. How many chairs will inhabit the set? Marjorie Owens will sing the demanding title role and to pique your interest further there is actually a preview snippet of her doing “Casta Diva/Virgin Goddess” with piano on the ENO site at https://www.eno.org/whats-on/15-16/norma

As well as a new Norma, the ENO is reviving their famous production of Philip Glass’s Akhnaten for the first time in decades. I recall it as being totally mesmerising. Their musical this year from sunset blvdearly April will be Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Sunset Boulevard and they’ve got Glenn Close to repeat her assumption of the main role as Norma Desmond. Michael Xavier, who was a brilliant Sid Sorokin in a recent Pajama Game, will be Joe Gillis and Trevor Nunn is directing. And while we’re in a Broadway time warp, there’s also an upcoming revival of Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim’s Funny Girl at the Savoy Theatre from early April that will star Sheridan Smith. This is great, it seems to me, for a younger generation for whom all these things are legends they could never before see live on stage. Meantime, a guys and dollsproduction of Guys and Dolls that originated in Chichester and transferred to the Savoy Theatre is so successful that it’s now transferring again, to make way for Funny Girl, this time to the Phoenix Theatre from 19 March 2016. Emma Thompson’s equally talented and totally wonderful sister, Sophie, is playing Miss Adelaide; and Jamie Parker’s singing as Sky Masterson was compared in some reviews to Sinatra’s! With David Haig as a fine Nathan Detroit, the musical is directed by Gordon Greenberg and choreographed by no less a dancer than Carlos Acosta. Beat that!

Meantime, at the ROH, there is that new production https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sehC_IP2Px8 of Boris Godunov for the first time in ages. Pappano is conducting and Bryn Terfel is undertaking the title role, with Richard Jones directing, so there ‘s a lot of excitement over that one! It opens on 14 March and hopefully will be broadcast to the world on cinema screens near you. Looking ahead to May, I would watch out for Enescu’s rarely performed opera Oedipe. There will also be a new production in April by Katie Mitchell of Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor that is strongly double cast.

Looking even further ahead to June, I am personally very keen for one special thing: that Audra McDonald is bringing her Billie Holiday show, lady daydirector Lonny Price’s Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill, to London. If you couldn’t get tickets on Broadway but are coming to the UK this is an absolute must. There is a fine Broadway cast recording, too. McDonald sings 14 songs and is never off the stage. Book now, and try this sample on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZTwdR3C6_E And please also try to acquire the Simon Rattle concert version of Leonard Bernstein’s Wonderful Town in which Lady Audra is a superlatively acted and sung Eileen. She is, as always, utterly gorgeous in every way.

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Cooper’s London

July 29, 2015

Theatre, Music

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Kenneth and Friends

Kenneth Branagh has formed a new company called – wait for it – The Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company. He will be co-directing branagh theatre co(principally with Rob Ashford)  who directed Branagh in Macbeth not so long ago and worked with him on his recent film of Cinderella for Disney. Ashford himself, if you did not already know branagh and ashfordthis, is a Tony, Olivier, Emmy, Drama Desk, and Outer Circle Award-winner and multiple nominee for his directing and choreography. The creative team of this company also includes designer Christopher Oram. Branagh will clearly be employing a mixture of interesting established actors and extremely talented young emergent ones and I would advise booking tickets right now. If you’re interested, I’m tempted to say it’s worth the trip even if you’re living abroad . The program is running for a year at London’s Garrick Theatre, so there are lots of chances to see what the buzz is about.

First up in repertory is Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale denchnewly re-imagined (don’t ask me, I dunno what that’s supposed to mean! It’s what it says on the label). I have spotted the fact that Branagh and Ashford are co-directing, which is promising; and the big news is that the role of Paulina is to be played by Judi Dench – a fascinating piece of casting in a pivotal role. Branagh himself plays Leontes. The Tale runs 17 October 2015 to 16 January 2016.

jacobiAnother inspired piece of anti-ageist casting is that of Derek Jacobi as Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, which also has the two stars of Branagh’s recent Cinderella film as the lovers – Lily James and Richard Madden.

Lily James and Richard Madden arrive as Disney Pictures presents the world premiere of "Cinderella" at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California on Sunday, March 1, 2015. .(Photo: Alex J. Berliner/ ABImages)

Lily James and Richard Madden arrive as Disney Pictures presents the world premiere of “Cinderella” at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California on Sunday, March 1, 2015. .(Photo: Alex J. Berliner/ ABImages)

Even if you haven’t seen Cinderella, it’s likely you’ve seen these actors; James is also Lady Rose in Downton Abbey, and Madden plays Robb Stark in Game of Thrones. Romeo and Juliet runs from 12 May to 13 August 2016.

In between you can also catch the now-underrated Terence Rattigan’s charming and hilarious Harlequinade, starring Branagh and directed by the multi-talented Ashford (this will be presented in rep with The Winter’s Tale from 17 October to 16 January); and an English adaptation of a classic French farce by Francis Veber called The Painkiller. In this translation, starring Branagh and the inimitable Rob Brydon, the adaptation and direction (already a hit in Belfast) are by Sean Foley. Veber also wrote Le Diner des Cons, adapted by Billy Wilder for the film Buddy Buddy. Essentially, Rob Brydon is being Jack Lemmon and Kenneth Branagh is being Walter Matthau. It runs 5 March to 30 April 2016. Finally, Branagh, who played Olivier so successfully in the film My Week with Marilyn, is undertaking one of the iconic Olivier roles Archie Rice in The Entertainer by John Osborne directed by Ashford.

garrickWhat more do you need to know? Both men have done some impressive stage work in the past; both have access to the best actors and theatre professionals in all spheres. I once attended a wonderfully memorable season of Shakespeare plays directed by Branagh back in the late 1980s; I am quite fascinated by this new company and what I take to be its philosophy. The approach seems to me to be very much that of the legendary actor-managers of past renown, harking back to the age of David Garrick himself. How fitting that the season is scheduled for the theatre named after him.

Perhaps the Kenneth Branagh Season will lead to more seasons and more legends. It may not be wildly innovative or profound, but the proof will be in the pudding and it should be wildly entertaining! For tickets: www.branaghtheatre.com

Singing the Words

The Oxford Lieder Festival, founded and run by the kynochcharismatic pianist Sholto Kynoch, has announced its 2015 programme (running 16 to 31 October). Kynoch takes a rich, full and multi-layered approach to the artistic direction of this festival; it seems to be stronger than ever this year and to have become a kind of laboratory for exploring the best ways to approach and appreciate art song, whether you’re a performer or an aficionado. It attracts the most renowned of the current crop of singers and accompanists and the programmes are immensely appealing.

Last year the festival scored a triumph with “The Schubert Project”. This year’s theme is the words themselves and how various poets inspired different composers. Starting with a symposium connollycalled Words Into Music: Poets, Composers and Song that will run at Wadham College with forays into the Holywell Music Room, the opening recital that evening has the superb mezzo Sarah Connolly working with pianist Graham Johnson to perform songs by Schubert, Brahms and Wolf. Different days will focus on Fauré, Brahms and Berlioz; others on settings of Verlaine, Pushkin, Tolstoy, Heine, Housman, Hardy and the setting of English text, with a symposium on the tradition of performing songs in English translation. There will also be master classes from people like Sarah Walker and Roger Vignoles, a strand of Sacred Music performed in various college chapels, and even classes for amateur singers. Singers include Robert Holl, Christoph Pregardien, Anna Stephany, Henk Neven and Toby Spence; cooperwhile the pianist in residence is Imogen Cooper. There will also be recitals and chamber music. There is an Oxford Lieder YouTube channel that will stream some of the performances. With the beautiful historic city and colleges of Oxford as the setting and a formidable range of exceptionally talented performers, if you love lieder and want to wallow for a day, a weekend or the full two weeks in some amazing live performances, this is an excellent wallow.

wadhamcollegeoxfordparksrdentrance11apr08oFind out more at: http://www.oxfordlieder.co.uk/news/2015/05/2015-oxford-lieder-festival-highlights

Cooper’s London

July 20, 2014

Theatre

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Coming Up in London:
Summer 2014

A friend of mine just said, “There are so many many things I want to see in London right now,” and that’s likely to be true right through the summer and beyond, though many of them won’t be in the dead center of the West End, where the “same old, same old” shows continue to draw in the tourists.

lansburyThere’s nothing wrong with seeing Mama Mia or Les Mis for the first time or even yet again, and there are revivals one would expect, like Blithe Spirit to show off the undoubted and wonderful talents of Angela Lansburythe most iconic performer in London at the moment. However, there are some very interesting brave arrivals which I want to see, starting especially with a new regents-park-open-air-theatre-logo-1397058250production of the Gershwin opera, Porgy and Bess, at the Regent’s Park Theatre (17 July to 23 August). Timothy Sheader, Regent Park’s Artistic Director will direct, and that surely bodes well. His recent take on Arthur Miller’s All My Sons was a hit, and he’s also done some terrific new productions of major musicals in the past few years that benefited from his great eye and ear for casting. This time, he’s drawing porgy and besson talent from both sides of the Atlantic; Rufus Bonds, Jr. and Nicola Hughes take the title roles. I’ve been deeply impressed by Nicola Hughes in shows ranging from Lola in Damn Yankees (with Jerry Lewis), to Velma Kelly in Chicago, through one of the company in Fosse, and I expect her to be a definitive Bess. During her last time around in the role (2006-07) she was nominated for an Olivier Award.

And if you ‘re a Miller fan, there is a new production of The Crucible on at the Old Vic (24 June to 13 September).
yaelYaël Farber
is the director. I’ve been following her work for about ten years and she’s emerged as one of the most innovative, sensitive and totally reliable directors of our time. She’s always had a strong political interest and The Crucible, with its implications of and parallels to political witch hunting in our own times, is a perfect vehicle for her considerable talents. How many remember her play Amajuba (2007 Drama Desk award)? Or her recent Edinburgh Festival Awards winner Miss Julie (2012)? Farber is, for me, the draw for this one. electraAnother heads-up: Kristin  Scott Thomas will be following The Crucible into that theatre with Electra in a new version by Frank McGuinness (20 September to 20 December). I would go see Kristin Scott Thomas reading the proverbial phone book!

Director Nadia Fall, who is beginning to make a name for herself at the National Theatre, was in charge of the Harold Brighouse play Hobson’s Choice, rarely seen these days (played in Regent’s Park from 12 June to 12 July). With Mark Benton as Hobson, this was a real treat too. Let’s hope the weather holds for this summer’s open air eventsthe operas in Holland Park, but most especially Shakespeares’s Globe Theatre which has a very interesting season this year. The highlight for me so far was Antony and Cleopatra with the ever-wonderful Eve Best as Egypt’s fascinating queen and Clive Wood, who is one of the most memorable, powerful and intelligent Shakespeare actors in the UK, as Antony.

The highly recommendable National Theatre Production of The Curious Incident of curous incident the Dog in the Night Time is reopening July 21 at the Gielgud Theatre. Hugely successful and award-winning, this is the play where the roof literally fell in on its audience at the Apollo in Shaftesbury Avenue not so long ago. It’s a very strong translation of the Mark Haddon novel to the stage with a uniformly praiseworthy cast and a thought-provoking and emotionally moving story.

The new and stunning production of Julian Mitchell’s 1981 play Another Country at Trafalgar Studios 1 had an impressive cast and an equally impressive director (Jeremy Herrin). Richard III moved in with Martin Freeman and Gina McGee when Country moved on, and has been totally selling out. But you can try for August…

An old musical being given a new look is Richard Adler and Jerry Ross’s The Pajama Game. Already critically acclaimed during its run in Chichester, it’s directed by Richard Eyre, known for doing a fine line in musical comedy (his was the famous Guys and Dolls at the National Theatre and beyond!). pajama-game-2-05-14-shaftesbury-theatre-222
In an age of austerity and various financial problems, this musical about a strike in a pajama factory (from a novel by Richard Bissell, Seven and a Half Cents) as well as the nefarious dealings of a corrupt management is topical again. With a brilliant score that makes it one of the best musicals of the golden era of the 1950s on Broadway, I’m excited about it because it also stars Joanna Riding, one of the most consistently brilliant West End musicals performers (she was a superb Julie in Carousel and a totally convincing Eliza in My Fair Lady).

pajama gameIn the role of Babe, made famous first by Janis Paige on stage and then by Doris Day in the film, I’m betting she’ll live up to that standard with no trouble at all. The role of Sid is played by the very talented Michael Xavier. Both these performers would most likely have been huge stars in an age when musicals were written for the likes of Ethel Merman, Mary Martin, or Howard Keel. Indeed, I hope that seeing them on stage in a classic setting will inspire some young composer to do something original for them now. (The show runs until 13 September at the Shaftesbury Theatre.)

Weirdly, as one who usually cannot stand stage adaptations of movies, I am looking forward to seeing what they will do with Shakespeare in Love. I like the look of the cast, the director and the fact that the writer is Lee Hall of Billy Elliot fame. Now in previews at the Noel Coward Theatre. How will it stack up compared to the film? Stay tuned…

With things like The Scottsboro Boys transferring to the Garrick Theatre in the West End in October and a full, interesting season for the ROH and the ENO plus the usual range of world class concerts, there’s plenty of culture coming up on offer in London. And then there’s all the amazing stuff in Edinburgh for the Festival, and all around the UK. So go online, but don’t get a horse – get a car!

Cooper’s London

July 8, 2012





Fearless Prediction:
Arts Venue Discovery

This seems to be the year of Chekhov‘s favorite uncle. And as if it were not enough that New York has two hot-ticket Uncle Vanyas (see John Branch’s post of 12 June), I have just attended the new captivating production in London at The Print Room at 34 Hereford Road, a stone’s throw from the Portobello Road and Notting Hill. (Yes, it was a printing plant in its original life.) Lucy Bailey and Anda Winters are the artistic directors

The discovery here is the venue itself, open about 18 months now and hosting not just plays (pretty much a 100% success rate with critics and audiences so far), but concerts, art exhibitions, etc. It’s a small community venue – no bar, no restaurant, barely a toilet, but with each ticket you will be given a chit for a discount across the road at a rather good Steak and Oyster Bar!

The space itself is flexible and endlessly reconfigurable, and comfortably cozy. Yet, like Wonderland, it seems to grow. For this Uncle Vanya, about 85 chairs were ranged along the four walls in two rows and everything else was acting space, with an evocative and minimalist set and props.

The production was adapted—with great success—by Mike Poulton, who is obsessed with making sure that people discover Vanya as a comedy, and was directed by Lucy Bailey; it has played a sellout run with a recent reprise. The acting was concentrated, the actors full of energy. You lived the experience with them (sometimes having to be careful not to trip them).

Iain Glen, William Houston, Caroline Blakiston, Lucinda Millward and David Yelland were the five principals, and each one was vividly the Chekhov character he or she was playing. Glen has done some amazing things in the West End but is now probably best known for playing Sir Richard Carlisle (the early prototype for Rupert Murdoch?) in Downton Abbey. But above all, the wonderful William Houston was playing Astrov and I’d bet you came away from the play wanting to see him again.

But everyone inhabited his or her part with complete conviction–it was a true ensemble piece, and the emotions they were suppressing and with which they then exploded were brilliantly conveyed. You could enjoy the acting for its own sake as it went along; but you’d be analysing the characters and ambiguities for days thereafter. Could Stanislavky have done it with more truth or love? I ended up wanting to hug the entire cast.

It was a hot night in a small place and the audience was a bit po of face, I fear, being British and trained to think that you shouldn’t laugh at serious stuff. But even they let go with surprised hilarity at the most unexpected places because the directing, conceptualisation and acting were so good that, for once, all the black humour was there for the taking. It was also amazingly compassionate. Even the most self-obsessed, solipsistic and egotistical aspects of some of the characters commanded pity–and those laughs. The ending was as poignant as I have ever seen it. I wonder if they could transfer it to the West End and give it extra life? It deserves a wide audience.

Co-founders Bailey and Winters have come up with a real winner; not only in this production but also in the whole approach of this new off-off-West End venue. What is being done at The Print Room is a gift to the community and I wish it a long and happy life. It crackles with energy and promise.The summer will be taken up with concerts. If you can’t get to London right now, get on their mailing list. Given their track record so far, I would go see anything there simply expecting it to be worth the effort.

I predict that The Print Room will be one of the most dynamic and important places to experience the best of London’s theatre and arts scene. Meantime, explore their web site and their future: Print Room


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